• A Mission Sneak Peek: Your Thoughts Needed!

    The new online literary publication, Longridge Review, is coming together!

    LR will be somewhat similar to Essays on Childhood, but more formal. We will have a reading period, an editorial review of submissions for potential publication, and an accept or decline response system.

    In addition to Creative Nonfiction Essays, we will feature occasional guest columns on craft and visual artists.

    As we close in our mission statement, your feedback is appreciated. What are your feelings about the mission statement as it is now drafted? Is there something you think we missed, or anything that seems out-of-place?

    Please post your comments below, and thank you for your support!

    Our mission is to provide a free website that offers the finest essays on the mysteries of childhood experience, the wonder of adult reflection, and how the two connect over the lifespan.

    We are committed to publishing narratives steeped in reverence for childhood experience and perceptions, but we seek essays that stretch beyond the clichés of childhood as simple, angelic, or easy.  We want to feature writing that layers the events of the writer’s early years with a sense of wisdom or learning accumulated in adult life.

    We welcome diverse creative nonfiction pieces that demonstrate a strong perception of nuanced and revealing elements of the human condition.

     

    A Mission Sneak Peek: Your Thoughts Needed!

  • “How Do You Write An Essay?”

    Recently I’ve had several people approach me about my essay writing process. I enjoy thinking about the craft of writing, so it was simple for me to jot down a few bullet points to share by e-mail. Because I wanted to respond to the questions right away, I wrote the following thoughts quickly.

    Later, when I looked at them again, these points seemed like ideas that might interest anyone who wants to write a creative nonfiction (CNF) essay.

    CNF is different from novel writing or short story writing. There are overlapping craft elements in each of these genres of course, but I think the essay process can be a little bit less predictable and controlled. Or should be. The writer is, after all, trying to chip away at an experience in order to reveal its value beyond the obvious and beyond the individual. It can be a long process, but one I find most worthwhile.

    I’d love to hear your thoughts on how you go about writing an essay, or what questions you may have about writing in general.

    • I tend to focus on something unforgettable. Something that lingers in my mind from my own experience.
    • I try not to worry about whether or not, on the front end, other people will care about the subject matter. If I can’t forget about it, I’ve learned there is something there — a nugget — that speaks to the human experience.

      The primary objectives are:

      1) Express the human experience.
      2) Include the reader in that experience.

    • This takes many drafts.
    • So first I just write it as it comes to my mind. Then I walk away. Then maybe I do draft 2, and ask for feedback.
    • At that point the things that are and are not getting through usually are revealed.
    • For me, the essay is a treasure hunt. It takes time, and a dedication to write, review, and rewrite. Also, I have a need just to separate from the work for a few weeks if not longer at various points in its development. I can’t see what’s too close to me.

    Finally, and this was not in my e-mail text, it is essential not to fall in love with your own work. Often it is tempting to write about something we want to tell other people. We’ve decided that some experience means a certain something, and we are going to tell the reader what that something is and why he should care. This rarely results in a good essay. I like to accept the mystery that I may have no real understanding of what something means and trust that because I can’t forget it, there is something there to be revealed even to myself.

    Let the reader in. Let the reader see enough to draw his or her own conclusion. Let the reader be complicit in your work.

    Let it happen.

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