• I’m Sorry You Scare Me

    Elizabeth Gaucher:

    It’s an honor to have some work up over at BREVITY today, thinking about the highs and lows of literary intimacy. I hope you’ll give it a read. Thank you!

    Originally posted on BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog:

    Elizabeth Gaucher Elizabeth Gaucher

    For those on our email list, an unfinished version of this post went out yesterday, our fault, not the author’s! Please enjoy the full version.

    A guest post from Elizabeth Gaucher:

    “I think I have to apologize for something,” the message from my longtime friend read. “At first I thought I need to apologize for not reading your latest published piece, but I think I have to apologize for or admit to something deeper.”

    I felt my brows rise. This was coming from one of my oldest and dearest friends, someone who is also a writer, and it felt like a warning flare. I took a deep breath and read on into the mysterious sin. She had in fact finally read my column about the writing life for an online nonfiction journal. She was really moved by it. She apologized for not reading it sooner, admitting she wasn’t…

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  • A Mission Sneak Peek: Your Thoughts Needed!

    The new online literary publication, Longridge Review, is coming together!

    LR will be somewhat similar to Essays on Childhood, but more formal. We will have a reading period, an editorial review of submissions for potential publication, and an accept or decline response system.

    In addition to Creative Nonfiction Essays, we will feature occasional guest columns on craft and visual artists.

    As we close in our mission statement, your feedback is appreciated. What are your feelings about the mission statement as it is now drafted? Is there something you think we missed, or anything that seems out-of-place?

    Please post your comments below, and thank you for your support!

    Our mission is to provide a free website that offers the finest essays on the mysteries of childhood experience, the wonder of adult reflection, and how the two connect over the lifespan.

    We are committed to publishing narratives steeped in reverence for childhood experience and perceptions, but we seek essays that stretch beyond the clichés of childhood as simple, angelic, or easy.  We want to feature writing that layers the events of the writer’s early years with a sense of wisdom or learning accumulated in adult life.

    We welcome diverse creative nonfiction pieces that demonstrate a strong perception of nuanced and revealing elements of the human condition.

     

    A Mission Sneak Peek: Your Thoughts Needed!