Labor Day: The Day of the Prophets

From the National Archives: Photos taken by Jack Corn in 1974 of coal miners working for the Virginia–Pocahontas Coal Company, at Mine #4 near Richlands, Virginia

“This Labor Day, we Christians should stand in solidarity with the American worker, in the spirit of the “Social Creed of the Churches.” Labor Day is one of those national holidays that once commemorated an important dimension of the American experience, but more often now it just serves as another three-day excuse to eat hot dogs and watch fireworks. Labor Day ought to be an annual celebration of the American worker, an acknowledgment of the importance of the working class to the common good of the United States. With all due respect to the “job creators” to whom US economic policy is so subservient, the health of our economy and our democracy depends on labor, on the production and consumption of our working class. Labor Day offers a ritualistic reminder of our indebtedness and responsibility to our laborer-citizens. It invites our country to annually renew its pledge to protect the working class, in the name of the common good.”

Read more from my good friend, James Calvin Davis, here: https://jamescalvindavis.com/2021/09/05/labor-day-the-day-of-the-prophets/

You can purchase his book, American Liturgy: Finding Theological Meaning in the Holy Days of U.S. Culture, here (it’s SO GOOD), and everywhere books are sold: https://wipfandstock.com/9781725271319/american-liturgy/

Last Call for #BarnhillPrize Submissions

Our current submission period is open from June 1, 2021 to July 31, 2021. Submit your nonfiction to be considered for the #BarnhillPrize

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Previous winners of The Anne C. Barnhill Prize for Creative Nonfiction 

Mary J. Mahoney, Suburbs Plagued by Foraging Deer 2019
Marsha Lynn Smith, 4 Generations of Black Hair Matters 2020

Read all our published essays via our Creative Nonfiction menu tab.

#BarnhillPrize judge 2021 Mike Smith

Creative Nonfiction